Yoga Therapy for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a condition that develops when a person undergoes a traumatic event either one time or repeatedly. PTSD affects the mind, the brain, and the body. Often individuals with PTSD suffer from flashbacks and psychological overwhelm leading to a feeling that the event is being relived. As PTSD deeply influences the brain, many clinicians believe that body-based approaches are imperative for healing, since physiological changes must occur if one is to experience relief. Recently, Bessel van der Kolk MD, one of the world's leading authorities on PTSD, conducted research on yoga and PTSD and found that yoga has the potential to ease the symptoms of PTSD.
Yoga helps individuals cultivate a positive relationship with the body and regain a sense of internal safety. In light of these findings, Van der Kolk, has introduced a yoga therapy training program at the Boston Trauma Center, which specializes in treating PTSD.
I work with PTSD sufferers on a one to one basis so that I can tailor the practices to your unique needs.
If you would like more information please contact me by clicking here. 

 

CLIENT FEEDBACK

After having undergone nearly 20 years of hospital treatment, psychotherapy and group therapy for severe anorexia and complex PTSD I found yoga therapy helped me in a way to come ‘back to myself’ for the first time. I began to tentatively be ‘in’ my body during the sessions, to explore and say hello to the person I’d spent so long running from. It has been a strange and exciting experience on my yoga mat meeting myself for the first time as a more cohesive adult!

The one to one sessions with Jackie quickly became precious to my continuing recovery alongside the talking therapy; I think they compliment each other beautifully. With Jackie I learned so many ‘tools’; meditation, asana, and mantra, which are real and tangible to me, which I can turn to when I am struggling, no matter the time or place, and this has increased my confidence.
I have also begun to develop the capacity to enjoy a calmer daily practice at home and find some quieter space inside myself. The asana sequences I’ve learned have increased my ability to ground myself, and begin to feel more solid and real, like testing out gradually how it feels to be with myself, and my body in a more non-violent accepting way, to listen to and respond to this experience in a way talking therapy cannot offer. Jackie’s teaching style is delightful, as she fosters a safe, patient, and gentle experience, where I felt comfortable, and importantly for me this was accompanied by some very good humor!

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